Image

Cialis is a latest medicine for treatment of disturbances of erection at men. Cialis feature is its high-speed achievement (30 minutes) and a long-term effect (up to 36 hours). In this regard you can choose the moment which is most pleasing for sexual intercourse, having in style a drug in advance. It is feasible to take on Cialis in the hours of daylight and to be ready even next-door day. responsive ingredient - Tadalafil.

It buy cialis online uk no prescription also be used together with tablets or injections. Profiles work across most devices, meaning profiles you set up on one device will appear on all of your devices.

Categories: Male Enhancement | cialis on sale

Comments

  • Daemonax

    Daemonax

    March 10, 2015, 1:40 pm

    Here, let me make it clear because the others don't seem to have.

    "Before" only makes sense in the context of time, A happened, and then B happened afterwards. So A happened before B.

    You can only say that A happened before B though because they were events that happened in time.

    Outside of time there is no "before". The word "before" only makes sense inside time.

    As Stephen Hawking says, asking what happened before the Big Bang is like asking what is north of the North Pole.

    I hope this helps.

    Reply

  • gillesthegreat

    gillesthegreat

    March 11, 2015, 9:34 am

    It may not be just Sikh. Pretty much all of South East and South Asia has a strong male preference. South Korea has the same preference, and ratios are a bit out of whack there too (but not as much as the 793 to 1000). Ordinarily, it's about 105 boys to 100 girls, just about everywhere in the world. South Korea was at 108-100. China has the same phenomenon, and other parts of India as well.

    That said, I find it a bit sad that people in the 21st century are unaware of genetics. 'Changing' the sex after conception? Wow!

    Reply

  • Jasper1984

    Jasper1984

    March 10, 2015, 12:35 pm

    Firstly there is no original sin.

    Secondly there is no sin at all. Taking 'sin' to be anything morally objectionable, is up to the eye of the beholder, it doesn't mean it is ethically objectionable aswel.

    Thirdly, in my opinion if someone did something ethically objectionable, that doesn't make 'good done to him' any less valuable, from the pov that ethics is completely on the good/bad done on persons. However, there are ways collateral damage prohibits 'doing good to him':

    * Good done to him causes others to think they can do the same ethically objectionable act. (Thusly causing harm, decreasing the overall good done.)

    * Good done(/lack of bad) to him enables/allows him to do (other) unethical acts.

    * Good done to him hurts his victims(or society as a whole) emotionally.

    Now, admittedly, i can't say i can emotionally always follow this!

    Reply

  • disinfestator

    disinfestator

    March 10, 2015, 10:51 pm

    Has anyone noticed that in any news article dealing with protests or anarchism they consistently use the term "self-described anarchist"? What's up with that? Of course they're "self-described", that's what they identify as! You will never see the term "self-described Democrat" or "self-described Republican" used in the media.

    I think adding that qualifier helps to delegitimize anarchism and other leftist movements; painting it as the property of a handful of kooks rather than a political philosophy that predates communism, socialism or libertarianism.

    Reply

  • daychilde

    daychilde

    March 10, 2015, 3:09 pm

    That's right! All cops are bad and only want power and money and...

    Ugh. I can't keep this up.

    There are a lot of bad cops, but there are even more good ones.

    Like this situation - he lept out of the car and yelled "Where are you at?" -- which indicates to me that he didn't realize he'd run over him.

    Of course, it's the cop's fault that the guy ran, right?

    I hate bad cops. But assholes like you who just scream "FUCK DA POLICE!" are just as bad.

    EDIT: Yeah, rate me down. Who you gonna call when crime happens to you? You do you depend on when things go bad? If you truly believe cops are evil, you won't bother with 911, right? Right. But rate me down. Yeah.

    Reply

  • yulbyeung

    yulbyeung

    March 10, 2015, 7:09 pm

    I get this all the time and it confuses me quite a bit. My guess was always something along the lines of our consciousness being slower than our senses. Like if you hear a sudden noise, the time it takes for your brain to interpret the sound occurs before you consciously hear it. In other words, your brain hears it, but it doesn't tell you (your conscious) it hears it until a split second later. That split second I would imagine gives your brain time to formulate an image to accompany the sound when dreaming.

    This of course is most likely completely off.

    Reply

  • CampusTour

    CampusTour

    March 11, 2015, 3:35 am

    Well, here's the thing, the guy came here and asked for help. If you don't like it, downvote and move on. There's nothing in his request that requires shit talking, or worse, actively working against him. It's not like he's blatantly unqualified, or trying to win a silly radio contest.

    This company decided to make the money ride on public voting, and I've got news for you, almost nobody is going there and being objective. They're going there specifically to vote for one person or another because they were asked to. Maybe that person is their son, or friend, or facebook friend. Maybe it's a co-worker. Maybe their friend just emailed them and asked them to because he's angry about another candidate asking for votes on Reddit.

    Also, who are you to be calling somebody out on not being here long enough?

    Reply

  • c0rnd0g

    c0rnd0g

    March 11, 2015, 2:31 am

    "Reality" is a consensual agreement on how to judge our input. If the people that you've decided to give "authority" to are telling you one thing and some "others" are telling you something different then you will most always belive your "authority" figures and will make up the most amazing stories of conspiracy and such about what the "others" are saying. All of our "reality" is cherry picked from our "trusted" sources.

    Or you could decide to try and figure it out for yourself but that's a lot of work.

    Reply

  • AngMoKio

    AngMoKio

    March 10, 2015, 5:04 pm

    Maritime law. You need to hoist the flag the vessel is documented under in a specific size on the stern of the boat. Imagine moving your house into a new neighborhood every couple of months where the first thing you do is raise a large American flag. If there was anti-American sentiment in the world, I would know it by now.

    Interestingly, the only time it has been an issue is from Canadians.

    Also interestingly, my close American friend decided to hitchhike into Iraq from the Czech Republic shortly after the outbreak of the war. He was quite honest in telling everyone he met that he was an American - and had ABSOLUTELY NO PROBLEMS in Iraq until he tried to cross BACK through the border into Turkey. Turkey was a bit sensitive considering there were so many people fleeing the country.....

    Reply

  • NuclearWookie

    NuclearWookie

    March 11, 2015, 12:25 am

    If we have a problem with using tax money on health care, it isn't because we don't like the idea of our money being spent to help others. It is because we don't believe that the government is the most effective way to achieve such ends. We simply don't like the idea of writing the government a blank check and saying "here's all our money, hopefully you can spend it responsibly".

    And, on my analogy, I disagree that the mugging only benefits the mugger. The mugger [government], since he got the money without having to put much work into it, will be much more likely to fritter it away than to save it or spend it in a responsible manner. Mugging greatly benefits local drug dealers, liquor store owners, prostitutes, and so on [invasions, bailouts, health care]. It's not that great for the victim [the taxpayer], but he really doesn't have a say in things, does he?

    Reply

  • DesCo83

    DesCo83

    March 10, 2015, 6:37 pm

    At my work they made it so your corporate password works on multiple systems. Unfortunately my password is 12 characters long and isn't just [a-z|0-9]. I recently discovered that if I try to sign into the companies billing system (I'm a systems engineer, but occasionally I'll have to look up customer equipment in billing) it won't accept a password that long. Not only that, but if I try to type the full thing in, the app crashes. I have to remember to only type the first 8 characters of my password or it doesn't work.

    Reply

  • arulprasad

    arulprasad

    March 10, 2015, 7:14 am

    To validate your point about healthcare -

    Around this time last year, I was down with a sudden attack of backache. A really bad one. Since I didn't have any insurance, I was scared about looking for medical help, so just lay in my bed expecting it to magically heal. After about 3 hours of enduring the pain, I gave up and called my landlord. He called up the emergency no - 999 ( Like US - 911). An ambulance and a support team arrived in less than 10 mins, they bundled me up in a stretcher and took me to the hospital. On my way I asked the attendant how much it was going to cost me for the ambulance ride, and he said it will be taken care at the hospital. At the hospital, a nurse attended to me as soon as I was taken in, and a doctor came and did his checks 15-20 mins later. I was given a painkiller shot, an X-ray was taken to see if I had a fracture. In all, I spent about 2 hours at the hospital, and when I was ready to walk, they let me go home - With a handful of painkiller pills. An appointment was fixed to meet the ortho specialist, a few weeks later.

    The bill was $221 (if I remember correctly) and after the government subsidy, total payable was $21.

    I don't have a health insurance, and I'm not a citizen - Just a tax paying expat on an EP( Employment visa).

    How can I not love that place!

    Reply

  • antesonic

    antesonic

    March 10, 2015, 8:55 am

    I think it's probably just a more polarized field in terms of opinions. As opposed to many other professions, computer science is a concrete, rigorous discipline. There is not a lot of room for ambiguity in most programming situations.

    While some personalities may be prone to accept a middle-ground view, I would say computer scientists would be more likely to have a position and be able to explain why they think they're right. We see the same behaviors in the technical "holy war" topics that others mention here.

    That being said, this type of technical mindset often has an affinity for systems thinking, and religion is definitely throughout history a significant attempt at describing a system to explain the world. If a classic programmer does choose to adopt a particular belief system, I would expect him or her to have high potential to be very insightful in piecing together how the ideas interact and work together.

    Reply

Leave a comment